To hear stations on the Short Wave bands in Western Europe:

2300 - 2495 kHz - Tropical band. Hours of darkness, especially in winter.

3200 - 3400 kHz - Tropical band. Hours of darkness, especially in winter.

3900 - 4000 kHz (75 metres) - mostly Eastern hemisphere now. Hours of darkness.

4750 - 5060 kHz - again mostly tropical. Hours of darkness. American stations heard a few hours after darkness has fallen.

5900 - 6200 kHz (49 metres) - Western European daytime (not so good in Summer); much greater distances in the darkness hours. Long distances possible at night, especially in winter.

7200 - 7450 kHz (41 metres) - as the 49 metre band mainly. In the Americas, 7200 - 7300 kHz is part of the amateur band allocation. Worldwide reception in hours of darkness, especially in winter.

9400 - 9900 kHz (31 metres) - Worldwide coverage, especially in winter months. Day and Night.

11600 - 12100 kHz (25 metres), as 31 metres, but sometimes better in Summer, around "Grey line" time - the hour before and after sunset.

13570 - 13870 (22 metres), used in Europe and Asia; often good in both day and night and best in Summer.

15100 - 15800 (19 metres), a great band for worldwide reception. Works best in Summer and tends to close in the hours of darkness, although surprises can happen.

17480 - 17900 (16 metres), daytime reception. Variable in winter, tends to close in darkness hours.

18900 - 19020 (15 metres), only rarely used.

21450 - 21850 (13 metres), daytime can be outstanding, sometimes closed. In hours of darkness usually closed.

25600 - 26100 (11 metres), used extremely rarely, because it is unreliable. In the peaks of the solar cycle the band has potential for worldwide reception and strong signals. CB stations often venture into the upper end of the band.

No comments:

Post a comment